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I’m pretty guilty of “liking” and on occasion sharing a Meme picture or two. What’s a Meme picture? It’s one of those pictures that has a cute, snarky, or inspirational caption with it. After reading this article in Urban Faith though, I may curve my Meme enthusiasm. Although, I find most harmless. Read on: 

Why You Should Stop Posting Meme Photos on Facebook

Those photos with the snarky political and spiritual captions are doing more harm than good. If you value honest dialogue, resist the urge.

It used to be that you had to be stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic to be exposed to sarcastic, misleading, and — fine, I’ll admit it — occasionally entertaining slogans about politics and spirituality.

No longer is this the case.

See Confessions of a Gospel DJ Here!

If you use Facebook with any kind of regularity, you’ve probably witnessed the gradual proliferation of photo memes popping up like dandelions. And you may have liked them. You might have shared them. You might have even created a few. But I implore you — please stop. You’re making it hard for real communication to take place on Facebook, which is one of the few places where people with radically different worldviews can engage in honest dialogue.

Don’t believe me? I offer several reasons, with examples:

Reason No. 1: They’re often inaccurate or misleading.

Exhibit A in our proceedings is this gem above rebuking Christians for focusing on the wrong things. Now the fact is, the underlying truth behind this is something that I believe in strongly — Christians should be known more for how we help the disenfranchised than for what political stands we take. But the actual statement is just not true. Plenty of Christians line up at food banks and homeless shelters all the time — so much so, in fact, that these days it fails to even qualify as news. But you’d never know it from this meme photo, which relies more on stereotypes than actual data.

Check out:  Hart Ramsey Discusses “God’s Up To Something” [EXCLUSIVE]

And this image is just the tip of the iceberg. With the next big story involving a church or a Christian leader, there’ll be plenty more.

And even the ones that aren’t snarky in tone can be disingenuous. If they include any kind of statistical graph, for instance, they’re bound to manipulate or distort the truth in some way. After all, there’s a reason why Mark Twain referred to statistics as the worst form of lying. The best of these are usually large and thorough enough that they require full-screen viewing to accommodate all the details. But even these should be taken with a grain of salt.

And don’t even get me started on the photos-with-long-stories-as-captions, which are often just the same recycled urban legends from email forwards.

Read The Rest Of The Reasons Here!

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